Back Pain

 
The term commonly known as "back pain" may be technically referred to as lombalgy when it occurs in the lower spine (lumbar spine) or cervicalgy occurring in the upper part (cervical spine).

About three in four adults will have back pain during their lifetime and these numbers may rise due to poor postural habits and the increasing number of older people.
 
 
 
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Tips for Avoiding Back Pain

 
 
  • Wear proper footwear
  • Avoid repetitive movements or the same position
  • Avoid violent or excessive sports
  • Avoid improper handling of weights
  • Keep weight controlled
 
 
 
  • Choose the stairs and not the elevator
  • Maintain a correct posture to the computer
  • To pick up on weights, do with the right column and using the legs as a lever
  • Sleeping from belly upwards overloads the spine, one should sleep on the side with cushions
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Symptoms of the Disease

 
Back pain may be acute or chronic. Acute pain usually lasts four to six weeks, while chronic pain can last a lifetime, indicating a much more serious problem in the spine, such as cervical or lumbar disc hernias.

It is estimated that more than ¾ of the world population suffers from spinal / vertebral pain, better known as "back pain," most of the time this pain is intense and limits personal and professional life, decreasing quality of life and ability of the affected person to perform movements, such as spinal flexion.
 
 
 

Causes

 
There are different triggers factors for low back pain and neck pain. However, the postural question is among the main risk factors. Incorrect posture habits when lying down, sitting or performing any day-to-day activity, work and play can lead to spinal injuries.

A large portion of the population nowadays lives with back pain, resulting from poor posture, inactivity, incorrect positions in the work environment, domestic tasks among other associated factors, including the wrong execution of exercises.
 
 
 
 
 
 

Diagnosis and Examination

 
The patient's clinical history can contribute greatly to the diagnosis of back pain, such as a detailed physical examination to evaluate the posture, range of motion, muscle spasms, pain and muscle strength of the spine and upper and lower limbs.

The doctor may also ask for additional exams such as MRI or CT scan.
 
 
 

Treatment

 
The treatment of back pain depends on the cause whether it is a protrusion, a hernia, or whether the problem is only postural, muscular or ergonomic.

In most cases where pain from herniated discs is refractory to conservative medication, minimally invasive treatments should be used (Plasmalight nucleoplasty - more advanced nowadays, ozone therapy or radiofrequency).
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Low Back Pain

 
 
Low back pain is defined as a set of painful conditions that occur in the lumbar region, that is, in the lower spine region near the pelvis. These conditions are due to pathology in this region.
 
 
 
It is estimated that more than ¾ of the world population suffers from low back pain, better known as "back pain", most of the time this pain is intense and limits personal and professional life, decreasing the quality of life of the person affected.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Symptoms of the Disease

 
The affected patient feels pain in the lower back and muscle tension in the affected region. Mostly, you may find it difficult to sit or stand for a long time, which forces you to adopt new positions to keep you comfortable.

Lumbar pain can radiate to the buttocks, legs or sciatic nerve. The description of pain, such as pain in weight, tightness, burning or shock sensation, may help the doctor in diagnosing the type of pain.
 
 
 

Causes

 
There are different triggers factors for low back pain, but the postural issue is among the main risk factors. Incorrect posture habits when lying down, sitting or doing any activity from day to day, at work and at leisure can lead to spinal injuries.

But other factors can also be cited as causes for the development of low back pain, such as inflammation/infection, disc herniation, arthrosis or displacement of the vertebra, sedentary lifestyle, obesity, genetic factors, aging and emotional issues.
 
 
 
 
 
 

Diagnosis and Examination

 
In about 90% of cases the diagnosis and cause are established through the patient's medical history and the complete physical examination.

Complementary examinations such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be required to help determine the exact size and location of the lesion, and to exclude other serious conditions that cause low back pain (such as infections, tumors, or nervous compressions).
 
 
 

Treatment

 
Acute low back pain may improve over time after a rest period. In addition, there are therapeutic options available such as analgesics, anti-inflammatories, corticosteroids and muscle relaxants, which may help in the initial phase.
In cases where pain from herniated discs is refractory to medication, minimally invasive treatments should be used (Plasmalight nucleoplasty - more advanced nowadays, ozone therapy or radiofrequency).

The main goal of treating acute low back pain is to relieve pain, improve functional stability and prevent recurrences. Strengthening of the lumbar muscles and the use of containment straps may also a fundamental role in relieving pain.